Abseiling from German abseilen, ‘to rope down’), also known as rappelling from French rapeler, ‘to recall’ or ‘to pull through’), is a controlled descent off a vertical drop, such as a rock face, using a rope. This technique is used by climbers, mountaineers, cavers, canyoners, search and rescue and rope access technicians to descend cliffs or slopes when they are too steep and/or dangerous to descend without protection. Many climbers use this technique to protect established anchors from damage. Rope access technicians also use this as a method to access difficult-to-reach areas from above for various industrial applications like maintenance, construction, inspection and welding. To descend safely, abseilers use a variety of techniques to increase the friction on the rope to the point where it can be controlled comfortably. These techniques range from wrapping the rope around their body (e.g. The Dülfersitz) to using a custom built device like a rack. Practitioners choose a technique based on speed, safety, weight and other circumstantial concerns. In the United States, the term “rappelling” is used nearly exclusively. In the United Kingdom, both terms are understood, but “abseilling” is strongly preferred. In Australia, New Zealand and Canada, the two terms are used interchangably. Globally, the term “rappelling” appears in books written in English more often than “abseiling”.